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Movement is an important part of baby development and growth. Just like adults, babies need to expel energy to be healthy and develop new skills.

Placing babies on their stomach allows for them:
○ To stretch out their legs and arms
○ Start actively using muscles in extremities, back, shoulders, hips and neck
○ Explore their environment for sensory development
○ Improve vision

The more they move the more energy they burn which will help with:
○ Digestion
○ Sleep
○ Building endurance for activity

If you have any questions or concerns regarding your child’s movement or abilities, contact your pediatrician, healthcare provider or physical therapist.
Visit pathways.org for more information and resources.
... See MoreSee Less

Movement is an important part of baby development and growth. Just like adults, babies need to expel energy to be healthy and develop new skills.

Placing babies on their stomach allows for them:
○ To stretch out their legs and arms
○ Start actively using muscles in extremities, back, shoulders, hips and neck
○ Explore their environment for sensory development
○ Improve vision 

The more they move the more energy they burn which will help with:
○ Digestion
○ Sleep
○ Building endurance for activity

If you have any questions or concerns regarding your child’s movement or abilities, contact your pediatrician, healthcare provider or physical therapist.
Visit pathways.org for more information and resources.

Have you noticed that your baby tends to look one direction over the other?

This is not an unusual occurrence but could lead to a condition called Torticollis. Torticollis is the tightening of the neck muscles (Sternocleidomastoid, or SCM) that causes the head to tilt down and limits head/neck movement. Tummy time is a great way to help your baby stretch and strengthen their neck muscles to avoid or decrease the symptoms of Torticollis.

Much like baby Jack in the picture, place a baby on their stomach facing stimulation opposite of their preferred direction of looking. Stimulation can be anything from a toy, a mirror to watch themselves, or even you.

If you believe your child may have Torticollis, please contact your pediatrician, healthcare provider or physical therapist for further testing.
... See MoreSee Less

Have you noticed that your baby tends to look one direction over the other?

This is not an unusual occurrence but could lead to a condition called Torticollis. Torticollis is the tightening of the neck muscles (Sternocleidomastoid, or SCM)  that causes the head to tilt down and limits head/neck movement. Tummy time is a great way to help your baby stretch and strengthen their neck muscles to avoid or decrease the symptoms of Torticollis.

Much like baby Jack in the picture, place a baby on their stomach facing stimulation opposite of their preferred direction of looking. Stimulation can be anything from a toy, a mirror to watch themselves, or even you.

If you believe your child may have Torticollis, please contact your pediatrician, healthcare provider or physical therapist for further testing.

DON'T FORGET! NEW LOCATION!

Newman Physical, Speech, and Pediatric Therapy have moved into our new space inside Newman Regional Health.

We are located on the south side of the hospital. If you have any questions or need help finding us please feel free to call (620) 342-4100 or check out the map and pictures to see where we are.
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So, what is tummy time?

Well, it’s the time your baby spends on its tummy. Why is it so important? Tummy time helps to strengthen the muscles of the back and neck that help with holding the head up. When babies push up on their elbows and eventually hands, the shoulders gain strength to help with the next milestone of crawling. Time spent on the tummy has been seen to have a significantly positive association with gross motor and fine motor development, ability to move, and the prevention of brachycephaly (flattening of the head). There are a lot of milestones your baby will develop over the first year of their life, from rolling, to sitting, to crawling and so on. Tummy time helps to ensure that your baby has the strength to acquire these milestones without compensations.
... See MoreSee Less

So, what is tummy time?

Well, it’s the time your baby spends on its tummy. Why is it so important? Tummy time helps to strengthen the muscles of the back and neck that help with holding the head up. When babies push up on their elbows and eventually hands, the shoulders gain strength to help with the next milestone of crawling. Time spent on the tummy has been seen to have a significantly positive association with gross motor and fine motor development, ability to move, and the prevention of brachycephaly (flattening of the head).  There are a lot of milestones your baby will develop over the first year of their life, from rolling, to sitting, to crawling and so on. Tummy time helps to ensure that your baby has the strength to acquire these milestones without compensations.

Hey all! Caressa (left) one of the amazing physical therapist assistants and myself (Kylee - right) a physical therapist are here this month to talk babies and TUMMY TIME!!!

We want to share with you why it’s important, and give you ways to work with your kids who HATE it.
... See MoreSee Less

Hey all! Caressa (left) one of the amazing physical therapist assistants and myself (Kylee - right) a physical therapist are here this month to talk babies and TUMMY TIME!!!

We want to share with you why it’s important, and give you ways to work with your kids who HATE it.

A diastasis recti or abdominal separation can occur with pregnancy, long-term or short-term abdominal weight gain, or anything that increases intra-abdominal pressure (i.e., poor mechanics with lifting).

You guessed it...physical therapy can help!
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A diastasis recti or abdominal separation can occur with pregnancy, long-term or short-term abdominal weight gain, or anything that increases intra-abdominal pressure (i.e., poor mechanics with lifting). 

You guessed it...physical therapy can help!

A pelvic organ prolapse can happen to anyone and is fairly common. But common doesn't mean normal! Most importantly, we want you to know that pelvic floor physical therapy can help!

Call Newman Therapy Services at 620-342-4100 to schedule an appointment!
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Contact Newman Therapy Services at 620-342-4100 to set up Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy ... See MoreSee Less

Do you feel like your organs are falling out? Pelvic pressure?? or Trouble starting a urine stream??

This study may give you hope! 16 weeks of pelvic floor physical therapy with muscle retraining and lifestyle advice showed a 45% improvement in pelvic organ prolapse grade and a 63% of participants verbalized improvement in pelvic organ prolapse symptoms.

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18806910/

Hagen S, Stark D, Glazener C, Sinclair L, Ramsay I. A randomized controlled trial of pelvic floor muscle training for stages I and II pelvic organ prolapse. Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct. 2009 Jan;20(1):45-51. doi: 10.1007/s00192-008-0726-4. Epub 2008 Sep 20. PMID: 18806910.
... See MoreSee Less

Do you feel like your organs are falling out? Pelvic pressure?? or Trouble starting a urine stream??

This study may give you hope! 16 weeks of pelvic floor physical therapy with muscle retraining and lifestyle advice showed a 45% improvement in pelvic organ prolapse grade and a 63% of participants verbalized improvement in pelvic organ prolapse symptoms. 

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18806910/

Hagen S, Stark D, Glazener C, Sinclair L, Ramsay I. A randomized controlled trial of pelvic floor muscle training for stages I and II pelvic organ prolapse. Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct. 2009 Jan;20(1):45-51. doi: 10.1007/s00192-008-0726-4. Epub 2008 Sep 20. PMID: 18806910.