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What is Autism?

Autism, also known as ASD or Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder that affects one's communication, social interaction skills, speech and non-verbal communication.

This can make it difficult for individuals to communicate effectively to others and struggle in social settings. The way those with autism learn, think and problem solve vary from very highly skilled to severely challenged. Some individuals may need a high level of support to carry out day to day tasks, where some live independent.
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What is Autism?

Autism, also known as ASD or Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder that affects ones communication, social interaction skills, speech and non-verbal communication. 

This can make it difficult for individuals to communicate effectively to others and struggle in social settings. The way those with autism learn, think and problem solve vary from very highly skilled to severely challenged. Some individuals may need a high level of support to carry out day to day tasks, where some live independent.

Did you know that April is Autism Awareness month? We will be covering Autism all month long, including what it is, early signs, and how Occupational Therapy can help. ... See MoreSee Less

Did you know that April is Autism Awareness month? We will be covering Autism all month long, including what it is, early signs, and how Occupational Therapy can help.

65% of those who have had an acute stroke suffer from vision problems! Below is an example of what the world would look like with homonymous hemianopsia, a loss of half of the visual field, which is common after stroke.

Visual issues can include central vision issues, visual field deficits, or oculomotor impairments such as double vision.

Occupational Therapy can help to address these deficits through eye exercises and other activities to help correct these issues or compensate for them.
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65% of those who have had an acute stroke suffer from vision problems! Below is an example of what the world would look like with homonymous hemianopsia, a loss of half of the visual field, which is common after stroke.

Visual issues can include central vision issues, visual field deficits, or oculomotor impairments such as double vision. 

Occupational Therapy can help to address these deficits through eye exercises and other activities to help correct these issues or compensate for them.

Supporting our Track and Field ESU Hornets! #stingersup ... See MoreSee Less

Supporting our Track and Field ESU Hornets! #stingersup

Did you know 82% of those diagnosed with concussions suffer from vision related problems?

The good news is that with vision and occupational therapy almost all patients saw improved outcomes or total recovery!
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Did you know 82% of those diagnosed with concussions suffer from vision related problems? 

The good news is that with vision and occupational therapy almost all patients saw improved outcomes or total recovery!

Studies show that at least 50 percent of Traumatic Brain Injury patients suffer from visual dysfunctions, with one such study finding a 90 percent incidence of post-trauma visual complications1. Visual problems, however, are often overlooked during initial evaluation as symptoms may not be present until days, weeks or even longer following the incident.

If you think you are having visual issues from a concussion you should be evaluated by an optometrist who is trained in the evaluation and management of eye and vision complications of concussion.
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Studies show that at least 50 percent of Traumatic Brain Injury patients suffer from visual dysfunctions, with one such study finding a 90 percent incidence of post-trauma visual complications1.  Visual problems, however, are often overlooked during initial evaluation as symptoms may not be present until days, weeks or even longer following the incident. 

If you think you are having visual issues from a concussion you should be evaluated by an optometrist who is trained in the evaluation and management of eye and vision complications of concussion.

What is diabetic retinopathy?

Diabetic retinopathy is caused by high blood sugar due to diabetes. Over time, having too much sugar in your blood can damage your retina — the part of your eye that detects light and sends signals to your brain through a nerve in the back of your eye (optic nerve).

Managing your diabetes is the best way to lower your risk of diabetic retinopathy. That means keeping your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. You can do this by getting regular physical activity, eating healthy, and carefully following your doctor’s instructions for your insulin or other diabetes medicines.

Want to learn more? Give this National Eye Institute article a read www.nei.nih.gov/learn-about-eye-health/eye-conditions-and-diseases/diabetic-retinopathy
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What is diabetic retinopathy? 

Diabetic retinopathy is caused by high blood sugar due to diabetes. Over time, having too much sugar in your blood can damage your retina — the part of your eye that detects light and sends signals to your brain through a nerve in the back of your eye (optic nerve).

Managing your diabetes is the best way to lower your risk of diabetic retinopathy. That means keeping your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. You can do this by getting regular physical activity, eating healthy, and carefully following your doctor’s instructions for your insulin or other diabetes medicines.

Want to learn more? Give this National Eye Institute article a read https://www.nei.nih.gov/learn-about-eye-health/eye-conditions-and-diseases/diabetic-retinopathy

What is Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)?

AMD is a progressive disease that causes the death of the retinal photoreceptors, the light-sensitive cells at the back of the eye. The most severe damage occurs in the macula, a small area of the retina that is needed for sharp, central vision necessary for reading, driving and other daily tasks.

While our Occupational Therapists cannot stop Macular Degeneration, they can help to make sure you or your loved one stay independent and learn to live with AMD.
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What is Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)?

AMD is a progressive disease that causes the death of the retinal photoreceptors, the light-sensitive cells at the back of the eye. The most severe damage occurs in the macula, a small area of the retina that is needed for sharp, central vision necessary for reading, driving and other daily tasks. 

While our Occupational Therapists cannot stop Macular Degeneration, they can help to make sure you or your loved one stay independent and learn to live with AMD.
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